Posts Tagged ‘Arlen Specter’

Arlen Specter says Norm Coleman should win Minnesota election

May 5, 2009

Today, newly Democratic Senator Arlen Specter said that he hopes the Minnesota Supreme Court will rule in favor of Norm Coleman and that he will once again be seated as a United States Senator.

Someone get this man a primary opponent ASAP.

Someone get this man a primary opponent ASAP.

The revelation comes courtesy of an interview the Pennsylvania Senator gave for the New York Times Magazine.  The complete interview will be available this weekend.

Arlen Specter recently made my list of Democratic Senators that are in the back pocket of the banking lobby.  Specter voted against consumers by opposing the bill that would help to renegotiate home loans for thousands of home owners.

Many Minnesotans are pushing Norm Coleman to drop his pending lawsuit.  In fact, failure to seat Al Franken is chipping into Governor Tim Pawlenty’s approval numbers.

The Minnesota Supreme Court will wait until this summer to make a ruling.

RWP Rating: Bizarre

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List of Democratic Senators that are in the back pocket of the banking industry

April 30, 2009

I call on Americans everywhere to raise holy war on the following Democrats.  After their “Nay” votes on the banking reform bill Thursday, it is clear that they have been heavily influenced by lobbyists in Washington D.C.   Here is the list:

  • Max Baucus (MT)
  • Robert Byrd (WV)
  • Tom Carper (DE)
  • Jon Tester (MT)
  • Mary Landrieu (LA)
  • Ben Nelson (NE)
  • Blanche Lincoln (AR)
  • Arlen Specter (PA)
  • Michael Bennett (CO)
  • Tim Johnson (SD)
  • Byron Dorgan (ND)

    Primary opponents as well as a middle finger should be readied for all of these Senators.

    Fuckers.

    Fuckers.

    The bill on the floor would have saved millions of homeowners from foreclosure by renegotiating their home loans.  A powerful lobbyist group called the Mortgage Bankers Association ended up winning in the end.  Bankers celebrated the defeat of the bill.

    Earlier in the week, when the vote looked grim, Illinois Senator Dick Durbin made headlines by saying that “the banking industry owns this place.”

    I don’t understand the pressure from the banks.  If these houses go into foreclosure, they will not get their money back anyway.  In fact, the entire housing market will continue to fall and they will lose even more mortgages in the long run.  Get ready for more foreclosure signs.  Once again, Washington proves who they really represent.

    Of course, Republican Senators voted with the banks.

    The full story, along with how much money each Senator received from banks for favorable treatment, is available here.

    Arlen Specter switches to Democratic Party

    April 28, 2009

    Well, there was no way in hell Specter was going to win as a Republican in Pennsylvania.  Republicans had already been preparing primary opponent Pat Toomey for the Senate.  Latest polls in Pennsylvania had Toomey 21 points ahead of Specter among likely voters in the Republican primary.

    Like many sane people, Specter was forced out of the Republican Party.

    Like many sane people, Specter was forced out of the Republican Party.

    After Al Franken is finally seated, Democrats will have a full filibuster-proof 60 seats in the Senate.   Specter released the following statement today:

    I have been a Republican since 1966. I have been working extremely hard for the Party, for its candidates and for the ideals of a Republican Party whose tent is big enough to welcome diverse points of view. While I have been comfortable being a Republican, my Party has not defined who I am. I have taken each issue one at a time and have exercised independent judgment to do what I thought was best for Pennsylvania and the nation.
    Since my election in 1980, as part of the Reagan Big Tent, the Republican Party has moved far to the right. Last year, more than 200,000 Republicans in Pennsylvania changed their registration to become Democrats. I now find my political philosophy more in line with Democrats than Republicans.

    When I supported the stimulus package, I knew that it would not be popular with the Republican Party. But, I saw the stimulus as necessary to lessen the risk of a far more serious recession than we are now experiencing.

    Since then, I have traveled the State, talked to Republican leaders and office-holders and my supporters and I have carefully examined public opinion. It has become clear to me that the stimulus vote caused a schism which makes our differences irreconcilable. On this state of the record, I am unwilling to have my twenty-nine year Senate record judged by the Pennsylvania Republican primary electorate. I have not represented the Republican Party. I have represented the people of Pennsylvania.

    I have decided to run for re-election in 2010 in the Democratic primary.

    I am ready, willing and anxious to take on all comers and have my candidacy for re-election determined in a general election.

    I deeply regret that I will be disappointing many friends and supporters. I can understand their disappointment. I am also disappointed that so many in the Party I have worked for for more than four decades do not want me to be their candidate. It is very painful on both sides. I thank specially Senators McConnell and Cornyn for their forbearance.

    I am not making this decision because there are no important and interesting opportunities outside the Senate. I take on this complicated run for re-election because I am deeply concerned about the future of our country and I believe I have a significant contribution to make on many of the key issues of the day, especially medical research. NIH funding has saved or lengthened thousands of lives, including mine, and much more needs to be done. And my seniority is very important to continue to bring important projects vital to Pennsylvania’s economy.

    I am taking this action now because there are fewer than thirteen months to the 2010 Pennsylvania Primary and there is much to be done in preparation for that election. Upon request, I will return campaign contributions contributed during this cycle.

    While each member of the Senate caucuses with his Party, what each of us hopes to accomplish is distinct from his party affiliation. The American people do not care which Party solves the problems confronting our nation. And no Senator, no matter how loyal he is to his Party, should or would put party loyalty above his duty to the state and nation.

    My change in party affiliation does not mean that I will be a party-line voter any more for the Democrats that I have been for the Republicans. Unlike Senator Jeffords’ switch which changed party control, I will not be an automatic 60th vote for cloture. For example, my position on Employees Free Choice (Card Check) will not change.

    Whatever my party affiliation, I will continue to be guided by President Kennedy’s statement that sometimes Party asks too much. When it does, I will continue my independent voting and follow my conscience on what I think is best for Pennsylvania and America.

    Pretty disappointing that his position on EFCA hasn’t changed, but now that Specter will caucus with the Democrats, he may be more easily convinced eventually.  The Democratic Party doesn’t need another Joe Lieberman; the American people need health care reform, energy reform, and reform in the financial sector.  Hopefully, Specter is on board.

    RWP Rating: Real Fucking Weird